Qatar's first big seawater RO plant is nearly complete

The first large scale seawater RO plant in Qatar, Ras Abu Fontas A3, is to complete by the end of March 2017, reports Gulf Times.

Ras Abu Fontas A3 seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant will supply a million inhabitants including in Qatar's capital city, Doha

Ras Abu Fontas A3 seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant will supply a million inhabitants including in Qatar's capital city, Doha

Qatar minister of energy and industry, and chair of Qatar Electricity and Water Company (QEWC), Mohammed bin Saleh Al Sada, confirmed the news at QEWC’s annual general meeting on 5 March, 2017.

The QAR 1.7 billion ($467 million) gas-fired power and water project was originally slated for completion in Q3 2016.

Acciona Agua was contracted by Mitsubishi Corp to design and construct the desalination units, and will operate and maintain the facility over 10 years. Mitsubishi and Toyo Thai Corp were jointly awarded the engineer, procure and construct contact.

Located at Al Wakra, south of the capital Doha, the desalination plant has capacity of 36 MIGD (164,000 m3/d) and will supply a million people through Kahramaa, Qatar’s national power and water utility.

Additionally, Al Sada confirmed that Umm Al Houl power and water project is 75 per cent complete. More of the 2,520 megawatt and 136.5 MIGD (621,000 m3/d) complex is to complete in 2017, and the project is expected to finalise by July 2018.

Further, a solar power project is to be delivered by a joint venture company, Siraj Power, that will be established in March 2017. It will be 60 per cent owned by QEWC and 40 per cent owned by Qatar Petroleum.

Qatar looks to boost capacity ahead of 2022 World Cup (August 2016)


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