Why MFI is edging SDI as a fouling index


Figure 1: Fabric in hollow fine fibre permeator of Du Pont Permasep
Jan C Schippers, Sergio G Salinas-Rodriguez and Maria D Kennedy (TU Delft), UNESCO-IHE, and Siobhan Boerlage, Boerlage Consulting

PARTICULATE FOULING has plagued reverse osmosis (RO) systems since their first use in desalination and remains a persistent issue today for RO and other pressure-driven systems such as microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). In the early 1960s, the Du Pont company/Permasep Product successfully launched the hollow-fine-fibre (HFF) permeator onto the desalination market, where it dominated for several decades.
A well-known weakness of this permeator was its vulnerability to fouling. Initially, this vulnerability was attributed to suspended and colloidal matter in the feed water, ie, particulate fouling. Therefore, Du Pont developed, the Silt Density Index (SDI), initially named the Fouling Index, as a parameter to characterize the fouling potential of the feedwater for permeators.
The fouling mechanism turned out to be more complicated than just fouling of the membrane surface as initially assumed. Gradually it became clear that the fouling was initiated by local clogging of the woven or non-woven fabric between the fibres, which is needed to ensure equal flow distribution of the feed water (see Figure 1).

This article first appeared in the issue of Desalination & Water Reuse magazine.



Full PDF version of this article

Posted on 30 June 2014  



Source: Desalination & Water Reuse



This story is tagged as:


Click on a keyword to see more stories on that topic

Share this
del.icio.us   digg   technorati cosmos   blinklist   reddit   newsvine   nowpublic   stumbleUpon   Add to diigo
Retweet this on Twitter Facebook  

Make a comment?
Sorry, you must be logged in to post a comment. Click here to login.



© Faversham House Group Ltd 2014. Desalination & Water Reuse news articles may be copied or forwarded for individual use only. No other reproduction or distribution is permitted without prior written consent.

Register Now!

You are not
logged in
» Register for free

Why not register for your free newsletter with all the week's news?