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Victaulic acquires MTS desalination plug valve

Pipe-jointing specialist Victaulic has acquired the desalination business of Spain's MTS Valves & Technology, which designs and manufactures valves for the global desalination market, including the MTS Plug Valve.

Chinese companies found guilty of making fake valves

Employees at two Chinese companies have been given criminal sentences for making and selling counterfeit Hopkinsons Valves, which are manufactured by the Weir Group Plc.

The Tugun desalination plant.

Gold Coast desalination plant finally handed over

The Tugun desalination plant in Gold Coast, Australia, was handed over to the Queensland state government on 1 October 2010 and has become part of the South East Queensland Water Grid (SEQWG).

Flowserve valves for Perth 2 desalination plant

Flowserve Corporation announced on 3 June 2010 that it had received an order for plug valves for the Southern Seawater Desalination Plant in Western Australia. The order was booked in the fourth quarter of 2009.

Corrosion and vibration slow Gold Coast commissioning

The progress of the Gold Coast seawater reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination plant in Queensland, Australia, towards its commissioning targets has been slowed by several problems, which are now being addressed.

IDA launches reverse-osmosis certification program

The International Desalination Association (IDA) is to launch a reverse‑osmosis training certificate associated with its recently launched IDA Desalination Academy.

The adsorption pilot at a solar manufacturing facility near Riyadh focused on recovering reverse osmosis brine. Recovery rates are critical at the site, which is 100 miles inland

Adsorption pilot phase two will focus on ZLD

MEDAD Technologies, a specialist in adsorption, has worked to commercialise a multi-effect distillation adsorption desalination (MED-AD) system since spinning off from the National University of Singapore (NUS) in 2012.

Brochure online for SEDA Fall Symposium

The Southeast Desalting Association (SEDA) now has the brochure online for its Fall Symposium, titled Membranes: That's Where Water is Headed, on 23- 25 November 2011 in Clearwater, Florida.

From left, Akshay Deshmukh, professor Menachem Elimelech, and Jay Werber of Yale University, have studied the energy-saving effects of batch processes in reverse osmosis

Yale team models energy use in batch RO processes

A team at Yale University has modelled five RO desalination processes to understand what energy savings can be attained by changing process design.

Pentair to buy CPT division from Norit

Pentair Inc is to acquire the Netherlands-based Clean Process Technologies (CPT) division of Norit Holding BV in the second quarter of this year for € 503 million (US$ 705 million), plus net debt at closing.

Rotork RI Wireless enables remote monitoring of actuated valves

Rotork brings out a new wireless valve monitoring system

Actuator manufacturer and flow control company Rotork has introduced a new wireless valve monitoring and diagnostics product.

Launch of Teshie-Nungua desalination project postponed

Ghana's government has postponed the commissioning of the Teshie-Nungua desalination water project.

The Gold Coast  seawater desalination plant in Queensland, Australia

Some Gold Coast desalination issues still unresolved

A large number of non-compliance issues relating to the Gold Coast seawater desalination plant in Queensland, Australia, have been listed in a letter sent on 2 July 2009 by Keith Davies, CEO of WaterSecure, who are taking over the project, to the Queensland Department of Infrastructure & Planning.

Cutting the costs of corrosion in seawater desalination with shut-off butterfly valves

Lower cost materials and coatings used in addition to corrosion-resistant valve designs both urged on by preferences in plant construction contracts have reduced the capital and operational costs of valves used in membrane and thermal seawater desalination. The design of the valve too has a significant role to play in keeping a rein not only on corrosion but also cost of operation. This article first appeared in the issue of Desalination & Water Reuse magazine.

Low-pressure valves for desalination: time for a new look at the butterfly?

Across the entire water industry spectrum, valves are an essential element in the treatment of water and in its supply. The subject of butterfly valve technology and its suitability for desalination plants is one particular aspect that rightly demands attention, particularly in respect of specifying materials that will withstand corrosion. The centred-disc butterfly valve is a proven technology and, according to KSB's Amri Water Valve Division Competence Centre in La Roche Chalais, France, it is in widespread demand from all types of desalination plant. It is a simple yet effective design principle whereby the disc rotates around an axis at right angles to the flow. When open, the fluid passes around both sides of the disc. "Low pressure valves are rarely considered as a critical item," says Pascal Viaud, "but if not correctly specified at the outset of a project problems can occur over the long term. Wrong selection of valves can be the cause of up to 40% all operational problems, so the customer must consider the real importance of valves at the specification stage. Even though valves may only constitute 1% of the plant investment costs, it only takes a single valve to create problems and seriously affect plant production." Butterfly valves are installed in the low-pressure areas of a desalination plant, usually in the early stages of production upstream of the membranes and then again at the end on the permeate lines. By keeping the butterfly valves open each valve creates a pressure loss and with the centred disc the differential pressure is much lower than an offset disc valves. Where a high number of valves, say 1,000 units, are installed in a desalination plant the accumulation of pressure saved on each valve will contribute to lower energy savings. The full article first appeared in the November/December 2008 issue of D&WR magazine


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