Advanced Oxidation


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Carollo selected for Texas DPR health check

Carollo Engineers has been selected by the Texas Water Development Board to carry out detailed public health analysis of the first direct potable water reuse (DPR) facility in the USA.

De Nora's ozone generators have applications in industrial and municipal water treatment plants

De Nora pushes ozone generators as answer to Asia's water quality rules

De Nora has introduced its Capital Controls ozone generators to Asia at Singapore International Water Week (SIWW) 2018.

The City of Cape Town is poised to tender three new reuse plants to help ease the city's water woes

City of Cape Town to tender three water reuse projects

The City of Cape Town has outlined plans to develop three aquifer recharge projects as part of its ongoing drought response plan.

Denver, the most populous municipality in Colorado, will be served by the State Water Plan which proposes reducing the amount of water diverted from rivers and streams in order to extend water supplies in a sustainable and efficient way

Denver Water selects Xylem for unique direct potable reuse demo

Denver Water, Colorado, has selected Xylem as its technology partner on a new direct potable reuse demonstration project that eschews reverse osmosis.

Suez and Solvay research and development centres in China and Zurich provide technical support to develop treatments for specific effluents

Suez and Solvay win first contract in China to treat brine with AOP

Suez and Solvay have won their first contract in China to treat brine from a reverse osmosis desalination plant using a jointly developed advanced oxidation process.

Two direct potable reuse projects are currently in operation worldwide, in Texas, US, and Windhoek, Namibia

The Long Read: Do we have the technology for potable water reuse?

Water reuse for drinking purposes is racing up the agenda in the US and elsewhere. Work to draw up new rules for potable reuse is advancing in states including California and Arizona, as well as in Canada and the European Union. Technologies are being piloted, and plants permitted.

Evoqua wins Los Angeles expansion contract

Evoqua Water Technologies has won a contract with the Department of Public Works for Los Angeles Sanitation to supply its microfiltration packaged system as part of the expansion of the Terminal Island Water Reclamation Plant Advanced Water Treatment Facility in San Pedro, Los Angeles County.

Biwater bags California reuse contract

UK water technology group Biwater has been awarded a contract to design, supply and commission all process, mechanical, electrical and control components for a planned wastewater reuse demonstration project in California, USA.

Electrochemical desalination MoU signed in Singapore

A memorandum of understanding (MoU) between Singapore's national water agency, PUB, and Evoqua Water Technologies to further develop electrochemical desalination technology was one of five MoUs signed during Singapore International Water Week, which ended on 5 June 2014.

'The industry's tendency to evaluate technology on capital cost, as opposed to total lifecycle cost, impedes the application of new technologies,' Joe Gifford, Nanostone

Five Minutes With: Joe Gifford, Nanostone vice president of research and development

Joe Gifford, who is listed as an inventor on water technology patents in the US and globally, is Nanostone's new vice president of research and development

Swiss water treatment to use PAC/UF combination

Wabag Water Technology has announced two water-treatment contracts in Switzerland based on ultrafiltration (UF) and worth around € 6 million which were won by the company at the end of 2012.

IWA schedules nanotechnology symposium for China

The International Water Association is to hold a regional symposium on Nanotechnology And Water Treatment in China in 2013.

New membrane and desalination leaders in CH2M Hill changes

A number of leadership changes to the top water team of US engineer CH2M Hill were announced on 5 April 2012, including new leaders for membrane and desalination technology.

San Diego's advanced treatment facility viewable on YouTube

A video has been posted on YouTube of San Diego's Advanced Water Purification Facility, the centerpiece of the city's Water Purification Demonstration Project.

San Diego IPR demo open to public tours

The public can now tour the City of San Diego's Water Purification Demonstration Project, which is evaluating the feasibility of using advanced treatment technology to produce water that can be sent to San Vicente Reservoir and later distributed as potable water.

Parsons selected for California water-reuse expansion

California's West Basin Water District has awarded its largest ever water-reuse contract to Pasadena-based Parsons Corporation on a design-build basis.

High-visibility reuse demo awarded to APTwater

California-based APTwater, Inc has been awarded a contract to use its technology for a municipal water-reuse system for the City of Anaheim, California.

Bundamba Advanced Water Treatment Plant, Queensland, Australia

Bundamba wastewater reuse plant passes second quality test

The second Water Quality Report for the Bundamba Advanced Water Treatment Plant in Queensland, Australia, has confirmed the excellent quality of the purified water it produces and proved that the water is safe to add to the drinking supply, says government agency WaterSecure

Indians providing MBR wastewater treatment in Africa

Indian water technology provider Shivsu Canadian Clear International Ltd has won orders worth US$ 6 million from private organizations and governments in Africa to set up membrane-based industrial wastewater treatment plants in Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia.

Ozone improves ceramic membrane use for wastewater reclamation

Ceramic membranes have been used in the industrial production of beer, wine and cheese. One of the reasons for this use is the narrow pore size distribution, where careful separation of different size compounds can be achieved. Outside of Japan, the use of ceramic membranes has been almost non-existent for municipal drinking-water systems. The slow adoption of this technology is largely the result of a perception by many that the costs are significantly higher. While the capital costs may be higher, the whole life cycle costs may not be, due to extended membrane life and more reliable operation. Most water reuse today takes the form of indirect potable reuse. These schemes frequently consist of several steps including physical and chemical disinfection and advanced oxidation. They have the disadvantage of high cost and often poor membrane fluxes due to the nature of the wastewater being treated. The study outlined in this article is preliminary, but shows that ozone in conjunction with ceramic membranes for water-reuse applications has many advantages when disinfection and advanced oxidation is required. As opposed to polymeric membrane systems that cannot tolerate ozone, ceramic membranes in conjunction with ozone can achieve multiple key objectives in one step. This article appeared in the May/June issue of D&WR magazine.


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