Antiscalant


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New distributors and EU compliance for PWT

Membrane chemicals supplier Professional Water Technologies (PWT), the US arm of Canada's H2O Innovation, recently signed agreements with two new distributors in Brazil and Argentina, increasing its presence in South America.

North Sea gas RO package supplied by UK company

A containerised reverse‑osmosis (RO) desalination package is to be supplied for an unmanned gas platform in the North Sea by Salt Separation Services of Rochdale, UK.

AWC in full production at new Tampa factory

American Water Chemicals (AWC) has resumed full production of its membrane water treatment chemicals following its recent move into a new 41,000 ft² (3,800 m²) building.

PWT signs three new overseas distributors

Three new distributors in Malaysia, Singapore and South Africa have been signed up by Professional Water Technologies (PWT), the business unit of Canada's H2O Innovation Inc.

PWT to be represented by Omya in EMEA region

Professional Water Technologies announced on 6 September 2011 that it had signed a sales representative agreement with Omya International AG, a leading global producer of industrial minerals, and a worldwide distributor of chemical products.

BWA changes hands once more

Desalination and water treatment chemical specialist BWA Water Additives has been sold for the second time in three years for around £ 185 million (US$ 300 million).

A sustainable antiscalant for RO processes

One of the common complaints leveled at the desalination industry by environmentalists is discharges of brine from plants contain additional amounts of chemicals required to reduce scaling and biofouling. Carboxymethyl inulin (CMI) is an environmentally friendly antiscalant which has proven to be cost-effective in RO processes and therefore could have a positive contribution to addressing this concern. This article first appeared in the February/March 2011 issue of Desalination & Water Reuse magazine.

S Australia government questions Billiton desalination EIS

Desalination discharge led the list of concerns raised by the South Australia government in its submission on 24 April 2009 to BHP Billiton's environmental impact statement (EIS) related to its proposed expansion of its Olympic Dam mining operations.

The reverse osmosis pilot plant at Ras Abu Jarjur

Experience helps boost production and stability at Ras Abu Jarjur

Improving production with reduced expenditure could be the main targets of any desalination facility around the world. Such feats are being methodically achieved at Ras Abu Jarjur reverse-osmosis (RO) plant in Bahrain as a result of a series of improvements. Of the many available desalination techniques, RO was seen from the earliest days as a reliable and cost-effective technology and was therefore employed at Ras Abu Jarjur. From the huge quantity of groundwater (40 million m /year) extracted from borewells, potable water totalling 29 million m /year is produced. The other 30% of water is being rejected to the Arabian Gulf, which has a similar salinity level and higher temperatures. Trials are being carried out to extend the brine staging by one more stage from two to three for the ninth and tenth trains and from three to four for the first to eighth trains, as the reject water from the trains is already filtered, acidified, dosed with antiscalant and most importantly possessing the required pressure energy (minimum of 38 bar) to be used. This strategy would increase the overall water recovery by another 4.5%. By closely following the guidelines of the scaling indices, solubility product limits of potential scale-forming constituents in the water and various performance-monitoring tools, it would be possible to recover another 2% of the water. The full article first appeared in the November/December 2008 issue of D&WR magazine. The paper on which it was based was awarded the prize for Best Oral Presentation at the International Desalination Association World Congress in Maspalomas in 2007.

Antiscalant removes need for acid in wastewater RO

Field trials of a new scale-inhibiting chemical for use with reverse-osmosis membranes in wastewater reuse plants show that, at a low dose rate, it can increase the solubility of calcium phosphate by over one hundred times, obviating the need for using dangerous and costly acid. Current design practices for large effluent reuse projects are focused on a combination of removing phosphate by precipitation prior to the RO plant and acid dosing to reduce pH to 6.0 and hence increase calcium phosphate solubility to prevent fouling. Conventional antiscalants are ineffective at high phosphate and high recovery rates, and the only other option has been to dose large quantities of acid to reduce feed pH to below 6.2. Reducing the pH from 7.5 to 6.0 on a 2,700 m /day plant would require 0.5 to 1 ton of 95% sulphuric acid per day. Handling this quantity of acid is an environmental, health, safety and logistical problem that many plant operators would like to move away from. The results from the field trials show that using a highly active threshold inhibiting antiscalant such as Genesys PHO at a low dose rate of 2 -5 mg/L can increase the solubility of calcium phosphate by over one hundred times. This article appeared in D&WR magazine's August/September 2008 issue.


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